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Discusses alternatives for immune disorders

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Gut microbes influence behavior - The Scientist - Magazine of the Life Sciences [Mar. 18th, 2011|08:53 pm]
Discusses alternatives for immune disorders

aylara
Gut microbes influence behavior - The Scientist - Magazine of the Life Sciences
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Linoleic acid and ulcerative colitis [Feb. 7th, 2010|12:04 pm]
Discusses alternatives for immune disorders

aylara
http://gut.bmj.com/content/58/12/1606.full

Gut 2009;58:1606-1611 doi:10.1136/gut.2008.169078
Inflammatory bowel disease

Linoleic acid, a dietary n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid, and the aetiology of ulcerative colitis: a nested case–control study within a European prospective cohort study

1. The IBD in EPIC Study Investigators
1. Correspondence to Dr A Hart, University of East Anglia, Norwich, NR4 7TJ, UK; a.hart@uea.ac.uk

* Revised 21 May 2009
* Accepted 6 June 2009
* Published Online First 23 July 2009

The main finding of this study was more than a doubling of the risk of ulcerative colitis with the highest intake of the dietary n-6 PUFA, linoleic acid. If the association is causative then 30% of all cases could be attributed to such higher intakes.

Mod note: Correlation is not causation, but there is a statistically significant correlation between high consumption of linoleic acid and the development of ulcerative colitis.

Linoleic acid is found mainly in vegetable oils, according to Wikipedia. But in reading most of the entry, you will find that linoleic acid is found most often in grains -- wheat, corn, rice. The next highest source is nuts and seeds.

Factory produced meat will also be high in linoleic acid, because mainstream meat production involves heavy grain consumption, which is stored in the fat of said animals.

This could explain the success of the Specific Carbohydrate Diet in treating colitis and Crohn's disease. No grains are allowed on the SCD, and nuts and seeds are limited (even in the form of nut and seed butters).
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Vitamin D may protect against MS [Dec. 21st, 2009|08:27 am]
Discusses alternatives for immune disorders

aylara
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[Current Mood |busy]

Vitamin D and the Risk of Developing Multiple Sclerosis for British and Irish Migrants to Australia
Ashton F. Embry, Ph.D., Reinhold Vieth, Ph.D. and Colleen Hayes, Ph.D.

Hammond et al. (2000) recently documented that British and Irish immigrants to Queensland, Australia, situated at latitude 120-280, had a striking 75% reduction in their risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS) when compared with that of their native countrymen. Importantly, this reduction affected both adult and child immigrants. Furthermore, using migration data from the other Australian provinces, they elegantly demonstrated that the reduction in MS risk for the relatively genetically homogeneous British and Irish immigrants progressively lessened with increasing latitude, finally reaching zero risk reduction in the Hobart area of Tasmania, the highest latitude area (420) of Australia. These results, which overcome weaknesses in previous migration study designs (Gale and Martyn 1995), provide the strongest evidence to date that an environmental factor, which protects both adults and children against the development of MS, is abundant in Queensland at latitude 120-280, but lacking in Tasmania at latitude 420.

More...
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Schizophrenia and wheat consumption [Dec. 9th, 2009|05:50 pm]
Discusses alternatives for immune disorders

aylara
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This is your brain on wheat

Here's just a smattering of the studies performed over the past 30 years on the psychological effects of wheat consumption.

Oddly, this never makes the popular press. But wheat underlies schizophrenia, bipolar illness, behavioral outbursts in autism, Huntington's disease, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

The relationship is especially compelling with schizophrenia.

http://heartscanblog.blogspot.com/2009/12/this-is-your-brain-on-wheat.html
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Multiple sclerosis, an autoimmune inflammatory disease: prospects for its integrative management [Dec. 12th, 2007|11:23 am]
Discusses alternatives for immune disorders

aylara
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Multiple sclerosis, an autoimmune inflammatory disease: prospects for its integrative management

Kidd PM.

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is aptly named for the many scars it produces in the brain and spinal cord. A sometimes fatal, often debilitating disease, MS features autoimmune inflammatory attack against the myelin insulation of neurons. Thymus derived (T) cells sensitized against myelin self-antigens secrete tumor necrosis factor, cytokines, prostaglandins, and other inflammatory mediators that strip away the myelin and sometimes destroy the axons. Familial and twin inheritance studies indicate MS is mildly heritable. No single MS locus has been identified, but an HLA haplotype has been implicated. Unique geographic distribution of the disease is best attributed to some combination of vitamin D abnormality and dietary patterns. No pharmaceutical or other therapies exist that confer prolonged remission on MS, and obvious interrelationships between toxic, infectious, and dietary factors make a persuasive case for integrative management. The time-proven MS diet meticulously keeps saturated fats low, includes three fish meals per week, and eliminates allergenic foods. Dietary supplementation for MS minimally requires potent vitamin supplementation, along with the thiol antioxidants, the anti-inflammatory omega-3 fatty acids, and adaptogenic phytonutrients. Gut malabsorption and dysbiosis can be corrected using digestive enzymes and probiotics. Long-term hyperbaric oxygen therapy can slow or remit the disease. Transdermal histamine offers promise, and adenosine monophosphate may sometimes benefit. Chronic viruses and other infectious load must be aggressively treated and exercise should maintain muscle tone and balance. Early intervention with integrative modalities has the potential to make MS a truly manageable disease.
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Molecular mimicry revisited: gut bacteria and multiple sclerosis [Dec. 12th, 2007|11:19 am]
Discusses alternatives for immune disorders

aylara
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Molecular Mimicry revisited: gut bacteria and multiple sclerosis

Molecular mimicry is a possible explanation for autoimmune side effects of microorganism infections. Protein sequences from a particular microorganism are compared to known autoimmune immunogens. For diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS), where the infectious agent is unknown, guesses to its identity are made. Mimics are assumed to be rare. This study takes a radically different approach. Reported sequences from all known human bacterial and viral agents were searched for autoimmune immunogen mimics. Three encephalitogenic peptides, whose autoimmune requirements have been studied extensively, were selected for comparison. Mimics were seen in a wide variety of organisms. For each immunogen, the mimics were found predominantly in nonpathogenic gut bacteria. Since the three immunogens used in this study are related to MS, it is suggested that a microorganism responsible for autoimmune activity in MS could be a normally occurring gut bacterium. This would explain many of the peculiar MS epidemiological data and why no infective agent has been identified for MS and supports recently found MS gut metabolism abnormalities.

******
Basically, this is stating that molecular mimicry is not rare, and that a normally occuring gut bacteria may be to blame for MS.
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Specific Carbohydrate Diet [Dec. 1st, 2007|09:28 pm]
Discusses alternatives for immune disorders

aylara
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[Current Mood |tiredtired]

I have been absent for a while. The reason for this is that I have found a new diet.

The Specific Carbohydrate Diet is based on a book by Elaine Gottschall. A few decades ago, Elaine's daughter was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis. Doctors then, and some doctors today, tell people who suffer with the condition that diet has nothing to do with it and does not matter.

However, Elaine thought differently. She found a doctor who felt the same way, and Dr. Haas cured her daughter within two years. After this time, the doctor passed away, and Elaine went back to college to continue the work of Dr. Haas.

Her book, Breaking the Vicious Cycle, has given hope not only to people who suffer from ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, but also to parents of autistic children. Elaine was aware that her diet seemed to help children on the spectrum, as at least 50 percent of autistic children have gastrointestinal symptoms that have been ignored or undiagnosed. The diet has also been used for people who have been diagnosed with celiac disease, but have not responded to a gluten free diet in a satisfactory way, due to the previous damage caused.

There is a web site maintained specifically for individuals implementing the diet for autistic children. Participants are encouraged to read Breaking the Vicious Cycle before implementing the diet as listed on the Pecanbread web site.

I believe this diet, which is geared toward gut healing, is well worth looking into not only for ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, but for anyone who has a chronic illness or autoimmune disorder. All healing begins in the gut, as more than 50 percent of our immune system is directly tied into it. Others who may benefit include people with chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, or conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis or lupus. The diet is not necessarily lifelong, either; participants are encouraged to follow the diet for at least a year after symptoms have ceased, and then to slowly test other foods.

http://www.pecanbread.com

http://www.breakingtheviciouscycle.info
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Gluten ataxia in perspective [Nov. 6th, 2007|09:02 pm]
Discusses alternatives for immune disorders

aylara
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[Current Mood |working]

People who are gluten sensitive may present with gluten ataxia, brain dysfunction that presents as dizziness and loss of coordination. Any damage done by gluten in this disorder is permanent; lifelong adherence to a gluten-free diet is the only way to halt progression.

A study showed that individuals who present with sporadic ataxia are the MOST likely to have gluten ataxia. Some of these individuals have been diagnosed with the early stages of MS.

Prompt diagnosis is essential.

http://brain.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/126/3/685

http://www.ataxia.org.uk/press.builder/00016.html

http://www.ataxiaalternatives.com/faq/index.htm
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Dietary therapies for autism -- beyond GFCF [Nov. 2nd, 2007|11:00 am]
Discusses alternatives for immune disorders

aylara
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[Current Mood |optimisticoptimistic]

This is an information-dense web site about a mother who greatly improved the condition of her classic Kanner autistic son with dietary therapy, supplements, and vitamins. She details her journey here:

http://www.danasview.net/myson.htm

There are several case studies on here that explain why the gluten free casein free diet is only the first step for a wide variety of things that can be going on for your child.

Dana is also active on the GFCFKids Yahoo! group community. She has a lot of knowledge on a wide variety of therapies. It's enough to make your head spin, honestly.
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Body Ecology Diet [Oct. 28th, 2007|07:22 pm]
Discusses alternatives for immune disorders

aylara
[Current Mood |busy]

I'd like to thank the member who let me know about the Body Ecology Diet.

A couple of posts ago, I linked to some pages about enzyme support. The Body Ecology Diet operates under the same principles, except that it encourages fermented food support along with probiotic supplements.

The basic theory is about acid/alkaline balance in the body. This theory is touched upon in the Paleo diet, the Body Ecology Diet, and macrobiotics. The idea is that a more acid diet profile will lead to disease, and a more alkaline diet will lead to wellness. The standard American diet leans heavily toward acid (shocking, right?), and thus can lead to all sorts of problems.

If you are interested in this approach, I suggest you check it out. :)
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